The Nightly News
An Astronomy blog by Joe Bauman, Salt Lake City
Blog 58: Nature's geometry
Joe Bauman
07
August
2018

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  1. Blog 57: Messier 33, a hard-to-see giant
    27 Jul, 2018
    Blog 57: Messier 33, a hard-to-see giant
    The galaxy Messier 33 is a beautiful spiral star-city that is relatively close and therefore huge from our viewpoint, but it has such low surface brightness that it can be hard to find by telescope. M33 is also unusual for other reasons, including that a New General Catalog object resides within it. A quick explanation of the Messier (M) and New General Catalog (NGC) numbers: *** Charles Messier, 1730-1810, who served as chief astronomer at the Marine Observatory, Paris, searched diligently
  2. Blog 56: Serenity and chaos
    17 Jul, 2018
    Blog 56: Serenity and chaos
    Sunday night presented one of those astronomical alignments that can soothe the mind: Venus and the Moon were nearly cuddling, about one degree apart. [Here and above: telephoto view of the conjunction of Venus and the Moon, taken by Richard Garrard of the Utah Astronomy Club about 9:30 p.m., June 15, 2018. This exposure was made to show the part of the moon illuminated by Earthshine.] Cory and I were out to shop and walk in the park. We first noticed the lovely conjunction as we prepared to
  3. Blog 55: Visiting the Eagle Nebula with friends
    07 Jul, 2018
    Blog 55: Visiting the Eagle Nebula with friends
    We had just called on a globular star cluster and Paul Ricketts wondered where our next adventure should take place. Knowing he likes nebulas, I suggested that we try to photograph one. He chose a complex, sprawling, breathtaking example in the summer sky, the Eagle Nebula. Ricketts ordered the University of Utah’s great 32-inch-diameter telescope to slew toward the nebula, technically named Messier 16 (M16), and the instrument began to shift position. This was Saturday night, June 30. A few
  4. Blog 54: TESS is flying!
    27 Jun, 2018
    Blog 54: TESS is flying!
    NASA’s new planet hunting satellite, TESS, has entered its planned orbit, says a Utah native who is a member of the science team analyzing data to discover planets beyond the solar system -- and the last he checked it was "operating properly.” The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Base, FL, on April 18. It looped through a unique program of complex orbits, taking it around the Earth three times and past Moon before settling into a stable orbit that