The Nightly News
An Astronomy blog by Joe Bauman, Salt Lake City
Blog 7: Sketching the Heavens
Joe Bauman
17
February
2017

More Posts

  1. Blog 34: Planetary nebulas ... and Baby!
    17 Nov, 2017
    Blog 34: Planetary nebulas ... and Baby!
    Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light. -- First stanza of Dylan Thomas' "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night," 1951. A star is a perfect example of how to go into that good night. If larger than about eight times the Sun's mass, it will explode as a supernova, for a few days or weeks shining brighter than the entire galaxy that hosts it. If in the class of the nuclear furnace at the center of our solar
  2. Blog 33: The colors of stars
    07 Nov, 2017
    Blog 33: The colors of stars
    Take a mental trip to a dark site in the western Utah desert, accompanied by a friend who's an experienced star guide. This is June 6, 2019, on a clear, cool moonless midnight. "Want to see something 10,000 times as bright as the sun?" the guide asks. "Sure!" "Look directly south," and you peer past the ragged silhouettes of sagebrush toward the glowing bulge of the Milky Way. It’s always a lovely sight, especially now, when it looks like a tilted flying saucer with one edge continuing up and
  3. Blog 32: When I heard
    27 Oct, 2017
    Blog 32: When I heard
    For well over half my life -- and at age 71, that's a tall pile of years -- I have loved a poem by Walt Whitman, "When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer." WHEN I heard the learn'd astronomer; When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me; When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them; When I, sitting, heard the astronomer, where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room, How soon, unaccountable, I became tired and sick; Till rising and
  4. Blog 31: Kip Thorne
    17 Oct, 2017
    Blog 31: Kip Thorne
    Professor Kip S. Thorne, the newly minted Nobel laureate, will never forget his feelings when he learned the observatory that was the focus of his career had registered a disturbance caused by two black holes merging 1.3 billion light-years away. The detection was by the miles-long instruments making up the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which are located in Hanford, WA, and Livingston, LA. By the time they reached Earth, the brief jiggles in the fabric of space