The Nightly News
An Astronomy blog by Joe Bauman, Salt Lake City
Blog 43: Kepler times 400
Joe Bauman

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  1. Blog 44: Remembering Stephen Hawking
    17 Mar, 2018
    Blog 44: Remembering Stephen Hawking
    A boy in his early teens stood beside Stephen Hawking's wheelchair, asking a scientific question. The world's most famous astrophysicist smiled up at him with his lopsided grin -- and then nothing happened. Minutes passed. He must not have been impressed with the query, or maybe he didn't hear, I thought. But then came Hawking's famous, computer-generated voice, giving an insightful answer. During that pause, I learned later, his barely-noticeable hand motions had been moving his computer's
  2. Blog 42: Tyson Chappell, dark-sky poet with a camera
    27 Feb, 2018
    Blog 42: Tyson Chappell, dark-sky poet with a camera
    Meet Tyson Chappell, professor by day, dark-sky poet with a camera by night. His views of Utah's desert landscapes after sunset, with their starry backdrops, are works of art, while his affection for these magnificent lands and his appreciation of the views are those of a modern Thoreau. Chappell is a professor of anatomy and physiology at Utah State University Eastern, Price, where he is starting his tenth year of teaching; the institution is the former College of Eastern Utah. He has
  3. Blog 41: Oceans 235 trillion miles away?
    17 Feb, 2018
    Blog 41: Oceans 235 trillion miles away?
    This month exciting news about distant worlds has been arriving at light speed. *** On Feb. 5, the European Southern Observatory announced that the seven known Trappist-1 planets "are all made mostly of rock, and some could potentially hold more water than Earth." It was only in February last year that NASA told this world that the Trappist-1 star, located 40 light-years (about 235 trillion miles) from Earth hosts seven Earth-size planets, three of which are in the presumably habitable zone
  4. Blog 40: Astronomy
    07 Feb, 2018
    Blog 40: Astronomy
    I considered writing this blog about yesterday's epochal launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. We watched the spectacular take-off live via iPhone, as well as the successful upright landing of two of the three motors, and the views of Elon Musk's sporty red Tesla Roadster rotating in space with Earth in the background. Then came the firing of the top stage, which sent the Roadster and its "spaceman" mannequin soaring toward the asteroid belt. But what could I say that everyone isn't already