The Nightly News
An Astronomy blog by Joe Bauman, Salt Lake City
Blog 24: Weather or not
Joe Bauman
07
August
2017

More Posts

  1. Blog 25: A night on Frisco Peak
    17 Aug, 2017
    Blog 25: A night on Frisco Peak
    Frisco Peak, the highest point of southern Utah’s San Francisco Mountains, pokes up 3,000 feet above the sagebrush desert. The heavily wooded mountaintop houses a big set of microwave repeater towers. Windswept bristlecone pines and other evergreens and shrubs lean around the peak, which reaches the elevation of 9,660 feet. Mountain range after mountain range recede to the horizon. But what brought Nightly News there wasn't the microwave towers or the spectacular Beaver County scenery. Jolting
  2. Blog 23: Fireworks
    27 Jul, 2017
    Blog 23: Fireworks
    The Fireworks Galaxy, scientific designation NGC 6946, has that nickname for a good reason: more supernovas have popped off there than in any other known island universe. Counting the latest, the supernova discovered by Patrick Wiggins at 8:28 p.m. May 13, a total of 10 of these largest known explosions have occurred in the galaxy since 1917. The runner-up is the galaxy M-61, a large example in the Virgo Cluster, which has generated seven since 1926. An ordinary galaxy like ours, which is at
  3. Blog 22: Dedication
    17 Jul, 2017
    Blog 22: Dedication
    Utah’s most impressive astronomical event since the Big Bang happens Saturday, when Mike Clements' immense telescope and the new Kolob Observatory housing it are dedicated. The public and media will be welcome at the inauguration of the world’s largest amateur telescope, Saturday at the Stansbury Park Observatory Complex (SPOC), which is operated by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Ribbon-cutting, speeches, a chance to mingle with the telescope's builder and backers, and a free star party
  4. Blog 21: Sunspots
    07 Jul, 2017
    Blog 21: Sunspots
    If I had to make a prediction about next month’s total solar eclipse, it would be a cautious one that the corona will be thick around the Sun’s equator and thin at the poles. The reason involves sunspots. These are transitory dark splotches on the Sun, places where the magnetic field pushes through the photosphere. The photosphere is the Sun’s visible surface, a layer only about 60 miles deep -- a thin skin compared with our star’s diameter of 870,000 miles. Sunspots, which have magnetic