The Nightly News
An Astronomy blog by Joe Bauman, Salt Lake City
Blog 20: The Magnificent Lagoon Nebula
Joe Bauman
27
June
2017

More Posts

  1. Blog 22: Dedication
    17 Jul, 2017
    Blog 22: Dedication
    Utah’s most impressive astronomical event since the Big Bang happens Saturday, when Mike Clements' immense telescope and the new Kolob Observatory housing it are dedicated. The public and media will be welcome at the inauguration of the world’s largest amateur telescope, Saturday at the Stansbury Park Observatory Complex (SPOC), which is operated by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Ribbon-cutting, speeches, a chance to mingle with the telescope's builder and backers, and a free star party
  2. Blog 21: Sunspots
    07 Jul, 2017
    Blog 21: Sunspots
    If I had to make a prediction about next month’s total solar eclipse, it would be a cautious one that the corona will be thick around the Sun’s equator and thin at the poles. The reason involves sunspots. These are transitory dark splotches on the Sun, places where the magnetic field pushes through the photosphere. The photosphere is the Sun’s visible surface, a layer only about 60 miles deep -- a thin skin compared with our star’s diameter of 870,000 miles. Sunspots, which have magnetic
  3. Blog 19: "It'll take your breath away"
    17 Jun, 2017
    Blog 19: "It'll take your breath away"
    Every day we live with our local star, sometimes squinting at it for a moment at noon, often watching it set amid glorious pastels in the evening, occasionally aware of its shimmer through rainclouds during storms -- but how many have truly seen the sun? Its strange arches called prominences and the whitish atmosphere of beyond-scalding-hot gas extend far past the dazzling disk, but we almost never observe them because sunlight is so powerful that it completely hides these other
  4. Blog 18: The void
    07 Jun, 2017
    Blog 18: The void
    Carolyn Tuttle, president of the book club for which my wife, Cory, is treasurer, had an interesting question for me: "Does present-day physics accept the concept of void in the universe?" The group, Paideia, studies classical literature and Mrs. Tuttle was researching controversies in ancient Greek philosophy. The definition of void, according to Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary (1988) is “empty space.” If you go by the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, the meaning is more precise: