The Nightly News
An Astronomy blog by Joe Bauman, Salt Lake City
Blog 18: The void
Joe Bauman
07
June
2017

More Posts

  1. Blog 19: "It'll take your breath away"
    17 Jun, 2017
    Blog 19: "It'll take your breath away"
    Every day we live with our local star, sometimes squinting at it for a moment at noon, often watching it set amid glorious pastels in the evening, occasionally aware of its shimmer through rainclouds during storms -- but how many have truly seen the sun? Its strange arches called prominences and the whitish atmosphere of beyond-scalding-hot gas extend far past the dazzling disk, but we almost never observe them because sunlight is so powerful that it completely hides these other
  2. Blog 17: Sometimes
    27 May, 2017
    Blog 17: Sometimes
    I had not gone on a good astrophotography expedition since October 2015, and now that I had a new CCD astronomy camera I was anxious to try it out on galaxies – particularly NGC 6946, the Fireworks Galaxy, with Patrick Wiggins' newly discovered supernova. On May 5 I had attempted the project but didn’t get started because of the failure of the DC-to-AC converter that powers the telescope focuser. Now, on Tuesday, May 23, armed with a new converter, I drove back to a site near Vernon, Tooele
  3. Blog 16: Patrick Wiggins’ super supernova
    17 May, 2017
    Blog 16: Patrick Wiggins’ super supernova
    On Saturday night my friend Patrick Wiggins discovered his third supernova, and this one’s a treasure. It is a Type II supernova in the famous Fireworks Galaxy. Let's define the term. A supernova is the catastrophic death explosion of a star, the largest blast known since the Big Bang. *** A Type I supernova happens when a white dwarf star sucks material away from a nearby star that is locked to it by gravity in a binary arrangement. Its mass grows so great that it blows up. *** A Type II
  4. Blog 15: Building the observatory
    07 May, 2017
    Blog 15: Building the observatory
    The previous blog began the story of Mike Clements’ huge telescope and the plans for its relocation to the Salt Lake Astronomical Society's observatory complex in Stansbury Park, Tooele County. The focus was on the Salt Lake County man’s inspiration, drive, genius and hard work to make his dream come true -- to build the world’s largest amateur telescope. This astonishing instrument has a 70-inch-diameter mirror that weighs 900 pounds; when stowed horizontally the mirror housing combined with