The Nightly News
An Astronomy blog by Joe Bauman, Salt Lake City
Blog 11: The Home observatory-plus
Joe Bauman
27
March
2017

More Posts

  1. Blog 16: Patrick Wiggins’ super supernova
    17 May, 2017
    Blog 16: Patrick Wiggins’ super supernova
    On Saturday night my friend Patrick Wiggins discovered his third supernova, and this one’s a treasure. It is a Type II supernova in the famous Fireworks Galaxy. Let's define the term. A supernova is the catastrophic death explosion of a star, the largest blast known since the Big Bang. *** A Type I supernova happens when a white dwarf star sucks material away from a nearby star that is locked to it by gravity in a binary arrangement. Its mass grows so great that it blows up. *** A Type II
  2. Blog 15: Building the observatory
    07 May, 2017
    Blog 15: Building the observatory
    The previous blog began the story of Mike Clements’ huge telescope and the plans for its relocation to the Salt Lake Astronomical Society's observatory complex in Stansbury Park, Tooele County. The focus was on the Salt Lake County man’s inspiration, drive, genius and hard work to make his dream come true -- to build the world’s largest amateur telescope. This astonishing instrument has a 70-inch-diameter mirror that weighs 900 pounds; when stowed horizontally the mirror housing combined with
  3. Blog 14: An amazing telescope
    27 Apr, 2017
    Blog 14: An amazing telescope
    Sometime before the end of June, families, government officials, invited guests and astronomy geeks will gather in Stansbury Park, Tooele County, to celebrate the opening of a new feature of the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s observatories. It will be the fourth big telescope stationed at the site, the Stansbury Park Observatory Complex (SPOC), and the largest of the group. In fact, the telescope built by Mike Clements dwarfs all other amateur telescopes in the world. The main mirror is a
  4. Blog 13: The Garden of Enceladus
    17 Apr, 2017
    Blog 13: The Garden of Enceladus
    The news last week from Saturn’s moon Enceladus was thrilling. The possibility of life elsewhere in the solar system suddenly seems highly plausible. Less than two years ago, scientists of the Cassini-Huygens project announced that the Cassini probe orbiting Saturn had found evidence that Enceladus has an ice-covered ocean that envelops the little moon. It was discovered through analyzing the moon’s wobble, which was different from what it would have been if Enceladus were solid. The motion